5 Sentence Structure for Annotated Bibliographies

  1. Author, qualifications, thesis

  2. Type of evidence provided

  3. Purpose

  4. Audience

  5. Who might find this source useful and why?

    TIPS and questions to ask yourself when reading and annotating an article: Does the author follow this structure? What’s missing? Why might it be important? What is here that goes beyond the suggested format? Why might it be important or misleading?

To [Objectively] Unravel The Children’s Museum of Atlanta: a visual deconstruction of a children’s indoor playground

The Children’s Museum of Atlanta is an indoor playground that provides “30,000 square feet of hands-on exhibits”

 

The Children’s Museum of Atlanta is an indoor playground that provides “30,000 square feet of hands-on exhibits”. The museum displays two [roughly] nine-foot navy blue banners that overlap and crown the building attached to two stone pillars and to the sides of the building. The angular banner houses white lettering and a fake sun that sits atop the sign. 17 Glass panels pieced together serve as doors and windows to peek through the exhibit. The museum is separated into thematic installations; grocery store, charity/donation store, and a pond. The grocery store provides a variety of goods such as canned corn, sausage, condiments, and marshmallow fluff all created with a squeezable plastic material.  The Children’s Museum is located on the corner of Baker St. and Centennial Olympic Park Dr. and sits across from the World of Coca-Cola and is in walking distance from the Georgia Aquarium.

The museum is separated into thematic installations; grocery store, charity/donation store, and a pond. The grocery store provides a variety of goods and services such as canned corn, sausage, condiments, and marshmallow fluff all created with a squeezable plastic material and mini shopping carts fit for the ambitious shopper. The Children’s Museum is located on the corner of Baker St. and Centennial Olympic Park Dr. and sits across from the World of Coca-Cola and is in walking distance from the Georgia Aquarium.

Schindler’s Claims

  1. “Judicial solutions are unlikely to be successful” (sec. V., part B).
  2. Segregation gets difficult to counter when it becomes built into the environment by design.
  3. Public transportation design can limit access and this negatively affects people of color and the lower classes more often than white upper-class people.
  4. Architecture and infrastructure can be used to segregate, discriminate, and divide people.

LINK: http://www.yalelawjournal.org/article/architectural-exclusion

TO DO: February 13, 2017

  1. Revise posts and create more multi-modal posts and experience for readers (i.e. add images, sounds, and revise linguistic set-up to be easier on the eyes)
  2. Read, summarize, and create an annotation post for “Black Vernacular: Architecture as Cultural Practice” by bell hooks.
  3. Comment on two+ peer blog posts
  4. Post a segment about class discussions and the value it has in regards to our blogs’ growth.

The Varsity: A Deconstruction (Visual)

  1. What are the posts doing? Each post provides the reader with a different experience regarding The Varsity. Regardless of the experience, what each post does is describe the landmark in detail and the memories associated with it.
  2. What is the message of each post? The message of each post is to create a visual, audio experience for the readers in which they can almost experience the essence of The Varsity.
  3. Who is the intended audience? This article seems directed towards students that may be interested in historical landmarks for research.
  4. How might the information be useful? To Whom? Why? This information might prove itself useful to someone who is interested in the evolution of landmarks. Perhaps that person is a student writing an essay or someone older wishing to explore and revisit past memories.
  5. How does the author establish credibility? (ethos) The author establishes credibility (ethos) through proof that he/she has been to The Varsity and has collected a large amount of data to create a vividly descriptive objective analysis.
  6. What could be changed to improve the effectiveness of each post? To improve the effectiveness and purpose of this article? Regarding the visual deconstruction analysis, a greater awareness regarding word choice would greatly level up the article.           LINK: http://sites.gsu.edu/mmolini1/2016/10/02/the-varsity-a-deconstruction-visual/

“Parting Ways” by James F. Deetz (a partial analysis of the scholarly article)

“Parting Ways” by James F. Deetz provided knowledge in regards to the lack of resources available on the history of slaves and minority groups. In class, we discussed in small groups how the absence of documentation and detail(s) not only shed light on the attitude towards minorities, but it additionally paralleled it. “Fragmentary written records give us a partial picture, lacking in important details.”, is what Deetz can supply through research and history of Cato Howe and “his fellow blacks of Plymouth”. Slaves were commonly given alternate names under their owners care and as “Cato” was a “common slave name”, it rendered research fairly useless as no one person could determine if it was the Cato Howe they were looking for. This text has a very to the point, no-frills, dry style to it, yet it keeps me (and my small group) reading. The compelling part of this story for me is that these men (Cato, Quamany, Prince, and Plato), regardless of color, did so much for their country and lived their lives modestly. Yet, because of the color of their skin, they were unable to receive pensions the first time and even for Prince, unable to receive freedom.

ideal classroom

 This picture was taken on 01/23/17 by Willow Megan. This photo represents three students’ wishes of their idyllic classroom setting (money is not an issue). An observation made in class was that the majority favored a circular classroom. Students stated that this set-up allowed students to think more clearly as there were no physical obstructions that could cloud or distract them,  students to see the professor more clearly and allow for discussion of the class topic among peers.